Mathematics

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INFUSING EQUITY BY GENDER INTO THE CLASSROOM:
A Handbook of Classroom Practices

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STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF DATA BY GENDER
Vivian La Ferla Morgan, Ed.D.
February, 1998

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STANDARD: All students will be able to recognize gender bias, stereotyping and discrimination in school materials, activities, and classroom instruction.

GRADE LEVEL: 11 -16

OBJECTIVE(S):

  1. Students will be aware of the gender equity issues by analyzing data.
  2. Students will be able to recognize gender bias and stereotyping.
  3. Students will be able to apply descriptive statistics knowledge to real-world data.
  4. Students will be able to calculate the mean, median, mode, range, variance, standard deviation, graphical representation of date such as stem-and-leaf plots, bar graphs and box and whiskers plots.
  5. Students will be able to review and use the statistical process of: statement of a problem, data collection, calculation of descriptive statistics including visual representation of data, interpretation of results and conclusions.
  6. Students will be able to practice collecting data for analysis.

TIME: One month with time inside and outside of class.

MATERIALS:

  1. Access to data that is public information.
  2. Calculator and possibly the computer for constructing graphs.

PROCEDURES:

  1. Divide the class into groups with 3-4 students per group.
  2. First complete an activity where students are given a normative goal such as, women and men should receive equal salaries for similar occupations.
  3. Students are then asked to determine the hypothesis, the independent and dependent variables, to identify the logical categories of each variable and state how’ they would collect the data.
  4. The group members should return the next class with a possible hypothesis for the’ group to investigate.
  5. Each group should decide by consensus upon a hypothesis and determine how to collect the data. The data should be public information. Each group should submit their hypothesis and data collection procedure.
  6. During week two, the groups should have the data and begin the statistical analysis of the data.
  7. While the students are collecting the data, the class can continue its discussion of descriptive statistics. As each procedure is discussed, the groups should assess the appropriateness of the statistical procedure to their project and proceed with the calculations, if appropriate.
  8. Once the unit on descriptive statistics has been completed, each group should be able to calculate the statistics and prepare a written report to be submitted.
  9. Class time can be given, for updates and sharing of progress and difficulties.
  10. During week four, each group should orally present their hypothesis, data collection procedures, interpretation, analysis and results.

HINTS:

  1. Use almanacs and other reference materials for current statistics related to this standard.
  2. 1993 Handbook on Women Workers: Trends & Issues from the U.S. Department of Labor, Women’s Bureau is an excellent reference on laws and statistics for this lesson.

EXTENDED ACTIVITIES: This activity can be extended to hypothesis testing if appropriate sampling procedures have been used.

ASSESSMENT: The attached rating form or an instructor-designed rubric can be used.

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Mathematics